Tag Archives: Eating

Of Alehoof, Cat’s-Paw and Creeping Charlie

These names, among many others, all refer to a perennial, evergreen creeper, most commonly known as ground ivy. This plant, regarded by many as a weed, had numerous culinary and medicinal uses during our favorite decade. In fact, some people … Continue reading

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Compendiums:   When Egg Cups Met Toast Racks

Both of these useful table service pieces had been introduced in England long before the Regency. However, it was in our favorite decade that the two were combined to create an even more convenient breakfast serving dish. Made in a … Continue reading

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Bath Olivers:   Regency Diet Biscuits?

Regency characters visiting Bath to take the waters may want to accompany their panacea of choice with a few Bath Olivers, in order to ameliorate the not-so-pleasant taste of the water. Those who have embarked on a slimming regimen during … Continue reading

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Liquid Magic:   Lavender Water Through the Regency

Last month, I posted an article here about rose water, which, like orange flower water, was a popular ingredient in a plethora of concoctions created through the centuries, including during the Regency. Another popular, and even more ancient flower water, … Continue reading

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Before Vanilla:   Rose Water in the Regency

Some time ago, I wrote an article about the uses and applications of orange flower water during the Regency. It was one of the most popular ingredients used in cooking, medicines and perfumes in that decade, second only to rose … Continue reading

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Regency Bicentennial:   The Earliest Easter

This coming Thursday marks the two hundredth anniversary of the earliest possible date for Easter Sunday in the Western Christian calendar in half a millenia. Easter will not fall that early in the year again for more than two hundred … Continue reading

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Regency Canned Foods

Though they were not as ubiquitous as they are today, some canned foods were available during the Regency, thanks, in part, to Napoleon Bonaparte. The French General did not invent the process himself, but it is due to him that … Continue reading

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Regency Bicentennial:   Jellies Before Jell-O

This year marks the two hundredth anniversary of the introduction of the industrial manufacture of gelatin. Prior to 1818, anyone who wanted to enjoy a dish which included gelatin, such as jellies or aspics, would have to spend a great … Continue reading

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Napoleonic Prisoner of War Crafts

Before you reject the prospect out of hand, Dear Regency Authors, you might find that one of these unique objects could make an interesting prop for an upcoming tale of romance. Many prisoners of war held in England from the … Continue reading

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Hasty Pudding, or Pudding in a Hurry

By the Regency, hasty pudding was not as widely popular as it had been in previous centuries. Nevertheless, it was still enjoyed by many people as comfort food or a special treat during our favorite period. It depended upon where … Continue reading

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Silent Girls and a Dumb Cake

With the approach of Halloween, it seems only appropriate to share a superstitious tradition related to romance which was still observed by some women and girls during the Regency, often on that night. As with most superstitions, the specifics of … Continue reading

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Mayonnaise In the Regency:   A Luxury Sauce

Despite some apocryphal tales to the contrary, most food scholars agree that the version of this creamy sauce which we enjoy today originated in the early years of the nineteenth century, probably in France. There were also multiple versions of … Continue reading

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English Green-Glaze Ware

This unique form of ceramic ware was developed in Britain in the mid-eighteenth century. However, even after the first phase of its popularity, it continued to be made and used well into the Victorian period. Its introduction may very well … Continue reading

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The Magnificent Swan Service

It is unlikely that any set of dishes today would be described as "magnificent," but the grand Swan Service certainly merits that adjective. Though it was not the first porcelain service ever produced in Europe, when it was created, it … Continue reading

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Kickshaw:   Tasty Treat or Tawdry Toy?

By the Regency, the term had come to mean both. However, the word had its origins in the Tudor period as a small specialty dish which was interspersed with more substantial dishes on the dinner table during a grand meal. … Continue reading

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When Transferware Came Into Its Own

Transferware is a type of ceramics which have been ornamented by transfer printing. That was a method for decorating ceramics which was invented in England during middle of the eighteenth century. However, the popularity of transferware began to increase significantly … Continue reading

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Your Most Obedient Servant

This is a remarkable and charming little book which I was thoroughly delighted to find on the shelves of one of my favorite local used book stores. My discovery was completely serendipitous, since I had previously been quite unaware of … Continue reading

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