Tag Archives: Eating

The Magnificent Swan Service

It is unlikely that any set of dishes today would be described as "magnificent," but the grand Swan Service certainly merits that adjective. Though it was not the first porcelain service ever produced in Europe, when it was created, it … Continue reading

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Kickshaw:   Tasty Treat or Tawdry Toy?

By the Regency, the term had come to mean both. However, the word had its origins in the Tudor period as a small specialty dish which was interspersed with more substantial dishes on the dinner table during a grand meal. … Continue reading

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When Transferware Came Into Its Own

Transferware is a type of ceramics which have been ornamented by transfer printing. That was a method for decorating ceramics which was invented in England during middle of the eighteenth century. However, the popularity of transferware began to increase significantly … Continue reading

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Your Most Obedient Servant

This is a remarkable and charming little book which I was thoroughly delighted to find on the shelves of one of my favorite local used book stores. My discovery was completely serendipitous, since I had previously been quite unaware of … Continue reading

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Hollandaise Sauce in the Regency

Eggs Benedict is one of my favorite breakfast dishes of all time. Sadly, Regency characters cannot enjoy that delicious dish, since it was not invented until the 1860s, in New York City. Or can they? As far as I am … Continue reading

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Regency Bicentennial:   The Grand Banquet at the Brighton Pavilion

Two hundred years ago, this month, at the Royal Pavilion in Brighton, the great French chef, Antonin Carême, devised one of the grandest banquets of all time. This meal was so extraordinary that it has gone down in history as … Continue reading

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Some Pudding Cloth Lore

Puddings, in their wonderfully various forms, were a uniquely English culinary invention, as was the cloth in which they eventually came to be cooked. In particular, by the Regency, most families enjoyed a Christmas pudding during their holiday meal, and … Continue reading

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