Category Archives: Viands

Aspects of Food and Food Service

Hasty Pudding, or Pudding in a Hurry

By the Regency, hasty pudding was not as widely popular as it had been in previous centuries. Nevertheless, it was still enjoyed by many people as comfort food or a special treat during our favorite period. It depended upon where … Continue reading

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Silent Girls and a Dumb Cake

With the approach of Halloween, it seems only appropriate to share a superstitious tradition related to romance which was still observed by some women and girls during the Regency, often on that night. As with most superstitions, the specifics of … Continue reading

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Mayonnaise In the Regency:   A Luxury Sauce

Despite some apocryphal tales to the contrary, most food scholars agree that the version of this creamy sauce which we enjoy today originated in the early years of the nineteenth century, probably in France. There were also multiple versions of … Continue reading

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Kickshaw:   Tasty Treat or Tawdry Toy?

By the Regency, the term had come to mean both. However, the word had its origins in the Tudor period as a small specialty dish which was interspersed with more substantial dishes on the dinner table during a grand meal. … Continue reading

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Hollandaise Sauce in the Regency

Eggs Benedict is one of my favorite breakfast dishes of all time. Sadly, Regency characters cannot enjoy that delicious dish, since it was not invented until the 1860s, in New York City. Or can they? As far as I am … Continue reading

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Some Pudding Cloth Lore

Puddings, in their wonderfully various forms, were a uniquely English culinary invention, as was the cloth in which they eventually came to be cooked. In particular, by the Regency, most families enjoyed a Christmas pudding during their holiday meal, and … Continue reading

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That "Wicked and Pernicious Weed"

For such was one of the common condemnations of hops in early sixteenth century England. The hop plant was also considered to be an "unwholesome weed that promoted melancholy." Yet, within the next three centuries, not only were hops no … Continue reading

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